Friday, 22 September 2017

#BookReview Gone (Försvunnen) by Mo Hayder (SWE/ENG) @ModernistaRed

Gone by Mo Hayder
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

SWEDISH REVIEW

Mörkret sänker sig över West Country när kriminalinspektör Jack Caffery anländer för att intervjua offret för en bilstöld. Han har utrett bilstölder tidigare, men det här är annorlunda. I det här fallet har bilen tagits med våld. Och i baksätet fanns en passagerare - en elvaårig flicka - som fortfarande saknas.

Snart börjar förövaren kommunicera med polisen: "Det har börjat", säger han. "Och det kommer inte bara plötsligt att ta slut, eller hur?" Caffery vet att det kommer att hända igen. Kidnapparen kommer att välja ut en annan bil, med ett annat barn i baksätet.

Jack Caffery är en skicklig polis med skarpa instinkter; den bästa, enligt vissa. Men den här gången inser han att något är allvarligt fel: Kidnapparen verkar hela tiden vara precis ett steg före polisen...


**********

Om det är något Mo Hayder kan så är det att skriva böcker som går under skinnet på en. Precis som Dennis Lehane så vågar hon ta ut svängarna och det är med isande fasa man läser varje sida.

Försvunnen är inget undantag. Att läsa om kidnappade barn är hemskt och man vet inte om Jack Caffery kommer att lyckas rädda situationen. Caffery är en lysande polis, men i denna bok så verkar det som om kidnapparen kan förutse polisen nästa drag och ju mer tiden går desto mer lutar det åt att det är försent, att flickan inte kommer att räddas.

Sedan har vi polisdykaren Flea Marley, som lever med konsekvenserna från föregående bok, vilket stör henne i jobbet. Hon vet inte om att Jack misstänker henne för ett brott som hon faktiskt är oskyldig till men som i och med det Jack vet om det ter sig logiskt att han misstänker henne. Nu ger hon sig in kampen för att rädda den kidnappade flickan. Men är hon verkligen i form att ta sig an fallet? Kommer hon istället bara att riskera sitt eget liv?

Försvunnen är en ruggig thriller där den okände förövaren hela tiden lurar i bakgrunden och man sitter på helspänd på slutet när Caffery konfronterar förövaren. Frågan är kommer allting att sluta lyckligt?


Tack till Modernista för recensionsexemplaret!


ENGLISH REVIEW

November in the West Country.

Evening is closing in as murder detective Jack Caffery arrives to interview the victim of a car-jacking.

He's dealt with routine car-thefts before, but this one is different. This car was taken by force. And on the back seat was a passenger. An eleven-year-old girl. Who is still missing.

Before long the jacker starts to communicate with the police: 'It's started,' he tells them. 'And it ain't going to stop just sudden, is it?'

And Caffery knows that he's going to do it again. Soon the jacker will choose another car with another child on the back seat.

Caffery's a good and instinctive cop; the best in the business, some say. But this time he knows something's badly wrong. Because the jacker seems to be ahead of the police - every step of the way...

*********


If there is one thing Mo Hayder knows is it to write a book that crawls under your skin. She dares, just like Dennis Lehane can she write in such a way that it's with terror you turn each page.

Gone is no exception. Reading about kidnapped children is always terrible and you do not know if Jack Caffery will be able to save the kidnapped girl. Caffery is a brilliant police, but in this book, the kidnapper seems to anticipate every single move the police do, and as more time goes by, the fear grows that they will be too late.

Then we have police diver Flea Marley, who lives with the consequences from the previous book, which has consequences for her at work. She does not know that Jack suspects her for a crime she's actually innocent of. Although it's quite logical that he suspects her since he doesn't have the whole picture. Now she decides to search for the kidnapped girl. But, is she really in shape to help out? Or will she only risk her own life?

Gone is a tough thriller where the unidentified perpetrator always lurks in the background, and at the end, when Caffery confronts the perpetrator will you still question if everything will end happily...

Thanks to Modernista for the review copy!

Thursday, 21 September 2017

#CoverCrush The Little Angel by Rosie Goodwin

For new visitors do I want to explain that Cover Crush is something that my friend Erin over at Flashlight Commentary came up with and I adopted the idea together with some other friends. And, now we try to put up a Cover Crush every week. You can check below my pick of the week for their choices this week!



1896, Nuneaton. Left on the doorstep of Treetops Children's Home, young Kitty captures the heart of her guardian, Sunday Branning, who has never been blessed with a child of her own.

Kitty brings sunshine and joy wherever she goes, and grows into a beguiling and favoured young girl. But then Kitty is summoned to live in London with her birth mother.

At first London offers Kitty excitement and adventure. With her delicate beauty and the voice of an angel, she attracts a promising singing career and the attention of a number of dashing suitors. But those now close to Kitty are not what they seem, and her comforting old home at Treetops starts to feel very far away.

If Kitty is to have any chance of happiness, this little angel must protect herself from devils in disguise . . . and before it's too late.

Some thoughts about the cover:

I get a Christmas feeling seeing this cover. The woman in bright red with the snow blowing around her and the house looming in the background. I really like this cover and this feels like the perfect book to read when winter arrives. 

Check out what my friends have picked for Cover Crush's this week:

Stephanie @ Layered Pages






indieBRAG

#BlogBlitz Cold Blood by Robert Bryndza (@RobertBryndza) @bookouture

Cold Blood by Robert Bryndza
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

She fell in love with a killer, now she’s one too.

The suitcase was badly rusted, and took Erika several attempts, but it yielded and sagged open as she unzipped it. Nothing could prepare her for what she would find inside…

When a battered suitcase containing the dismembered body of a young man washes up on the shore of the river Thames, Detective Erika Foster is shocked. She’s worked on some terrifying cases but never seen anything like this before.

As Erika and her team set to work, she makes the link with another victim – the body of a young woman dumped in an identical suitcase two weeks ago.

Erika quickly realises she’s on the trail of a serial killer who’s already made their next move. Yet just as Erika starts to make headway with the investigation, she is the victim of a brutal attack.

But nothing will stop Erika. As the body count rises, the twin daughters of her colleague Commander Marsh are abducted, and the stakes are higher than ever before. Can Erika save the lives of two innocent children before it’s too late? She’s running out of time and about to make a disturbing discovery…there’s more than one killer.

Brilliantly gripping, Cold Blood will have you hooked from the first page and holding your breath to the heart-stopping and shocking ending. 

Book review 

I've had a blast the last couple of weeks devouring 3 Erika Foster books. I jumped at the chance to participate in this blog tour, but that meant that I had to read the previous two books before reading Cold Blood. Lucky me! Finishing this book also meant that now I have to wait for the next one. Which after this Erika Foster marathon feels a bit sad...

Cold Blood is the fifth and the latest book in the Erika Foster series and this time Erika has to stop a serial killer couple. Nina and Max are a modern-day Bonnie and Clyde couple whose love story pretty much starts off with a brutal murder. Nina is blinded by love for Max and right from the start is it pretty clear that he is using her blind devotion to him to make her do what he wants her to do. Should one feel sorry for her? Well, perhaps at the start, but as the story progressed is it hard to feel that much sympathy for her. To be honest, did I not feel that much sympathy for her at all, she didn't have a bad life, and the choices she made, well she made the bed....

Erika has her own problems in this book, besides the hunt for the serial killers is she faced with a betrayal that will danger her life and her relationship with Peterson seems to have come to a stop. Marsh is back, and that thrilled me as he is a character that I like and it will be interesting to see if he will be able to save his marriage. 


Cold Blood is an excellent book, with a story that thrilled me from the start. As always do I love reading about the characters personal life as well as the crimes that they have to solve and I'm looking forward to reading the next book in the series!
     

Author Bio:


Robert Bryndza is the author of the international #1 bestseller The Girl in the Ice. The Wall Street Journal and USA Today bestseller is the first book in the Detective Erika Foster series. 

The Night Stalker, Dark Water and Last Breath are the second, third, and fourth books in the series, and the fifth book, Cold Blood is now available to pre-order.

Robert's books have sold over 2 million copies, and have been translated into 27 languages.

In addition to writing crime fiction, Robert has published a bestselling series of romantic comedy novels. He is British and lives in Slovakia.
 


Author Social Media Links:

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

#BookReview Bone Box by Faye Kellerman @FreshFiction

Bone Box by Faye Kellerman
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

In this thrilling chapter in Faye Kellerman’s bestselling series, Rina Lazarus makes a shocking discovery in the woods of her upstate New York community that leads her husband, police detective Peter Decker, through a series of gruesome, decades old, unsolved murders, pointing to a diabolical, serial killer who’s been hiding in plain sight.

On a bright and crisp September morning, while walking a bucolic woodland trail, Rina Decker stumbles upon human remains once buried deep beneath the forest grounds. Immediately, she calls her husband, Peter, a former detective lieutenant with LAPD, now working for the local Greenbury Police. Within hours, a vista of beauty and tranquility is transformed into a frenetic crime scene. The body has been interred for years and there is scant physical evidence at the gravesite: a youthful skeleton, a skull wound and long dark strands of hair surrounding the bony frame. As Decker and his partner, Tyler McAdams, further investigate, they realize that they’re most likely dealing with a missing student from the nearby Five Colleges of Upstate—a well-known and well-respected consortium of higher learning where Rina works.

And when more human remains are found in the same area, Decker and McAdams know this isn’t just a one-off murder case. Short-staffed and with no convenient entry into the colleges, Decker enlists Rina’s help to act as the eyes and ears of campus gossip. Winding their way through a dangerous labyrinth of steely suspects and untouchable academics, Decker, McAdams, and Rina race to protect their community from a psychopathic killer still in the area—and on the hunt for a fresh victim.


**********

The fabulous cover for BONE BOX was the first thing that caught my attention and I found the blurb fascinating. It all starts with Rina Lazarus out on a walk in the woods, taking in the scenery not at all expecting to find human remains. Someone has buried a body and her husband police detective Peter Decker, a former detective lieutenant with LAPD, now working for Greenbury Police has to figure out both the identity of the dead person and who's behind the murder. And, it gets worse another body is found. It seems that there is a serial killer loose.

READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW OVER AT FRESH FICTION

#BookReview Det sista experimentet (The Last experiment) by Emma Ångström

Det sista experimentet by Emma Ångström
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

A young woman wakes up locked in a dark and cold room. She does not know where she is. She does not remember how she got there. It feels like she is living buried, as though she walks around in a coffin far below the ground. Someone seems to have plans for her, and the horrible truth is discovered soon.

The summer of 1995 is the hottest summer for decades and fourteen-year-old Dante is going to spend promising in picturesque Sundborn with his eccentric grandfather. There is also Signe who has a penchant for the occult and Dante's charismatic childhood friend Freja.

But the summer idyll is soon broken and a new world opens when Freja draws Dante into a whirlwind of black art and unknown forces.

**********

I'm disappointed! Emma Ångström debut book was great, but this one started off promising, but as the story progressed did I find myself more and more dissatisfied with the way the story took. 

Thankfully did I listen to the audiobook and it was a short book so it didn't take much time (double the speed and the hours flew by)! I spoil the book a bit now, so don't read the rest of the review if you don't want to have an inkling about the ending!

First, nothing really happened for the first half the book and then the last part of the book was really bad. It felt like reading a YA book, and the author throws in a lot of paranormal history since the main characters are teenagers and didn't have so much beforehand knowledge. But, for the reader (for me at least) was the way author had incorporated all this history plain boring to listen to. Perhaps, it would have worked better if I had cared more for the characters. Then, we have the last part, IDIOTS! I mean the last 1/3 of the book made me seriously irritated and I mentally just wanted the kids to sit down and watch the movie flatliners and see how bad it is to wonder what happens after death. IDIOTS!

Also, there is a side story with a kidnapped woman (obviously in present time) and that part was even worst to listen to and the conclusion of that story, the connection this had to the Dante and Freja's story in the past was neither surprising nor especially interesting.

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

#BookReview Caroline: Little House, Revisited by Sarah Miller @WmMorrowBooks

Caroline: Little House, Revisited by Sarah Miller
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

In this novel authorized by the Little House estate, Sarah Miller vividly recreates the beauty, hardship, and joys of the frontier in a dazzling work of historical fiction, a captivating story that illuminates one courageous, resilient, and loving pioneer woman as never before—Caroline Ingalls, "Ma" in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s beloved Little House books.

In the frigid days of February, 1870, Caroline Ingalls and her family leave the familiar comforts of the Big Woods of Wisconsin and the warm bosom of her family, for a new life in Kansas Indian Territory. Packing what they can carry in their wagon, Caroline, her husband Charles, and their little girls, Mary and Laura, head west to settle in a beautiful, unpredictable land full of promise and peril.

The pioneer life is a hard one, especially for a pregnant woman with no friends or kin to turn to for comfort or help. The burden of work must be shouldered alone, sickness tended without the aid of doctors, and babies birthed without the accustomed hands of mothers or sisters. But Caroline’s new world is also full of tender joys. In adapting to this strange new place and transforming a rough log house built by Charles’ hands into a home, Caroline must draw on untapped wells of strength she does not know she possesses.

For more than eighty years, generations of readers have been enchanted by the adventures of the American frontier’s most famous child, Laura Ingalls Wilder, in the Little House books. Now, that familiar story is retold in this captivating tale of family, fidelity, hardship, love, and survival that vividly reimagines our past.


*********

OK, I just wanted to say that this book, I really wanted to love the story more than I did. I love the TV series and the books the show is also good. And, this book is one that I really, really looked forward to reading. However, I found that the story never really got to me.

I liked the whole idea of reading the book from Caroline's perspective, as a young wife and mother on her way to a new home. Her fears as she is pregnant and the whole idea of leaving everything and everyone behind got to me. It's just the everyday worries during the travel, well it felt a bit tedious to read about. Sure, it was interesting, but at the same time did I feel that it went on and one now and then. 

I liked the idea of the book, about reading about Charles, Caroline, and the children traveling to Kansas. If you have read the books and/or seen the TV series is this a must read. Sure, I found the story not perhaps living up to my expectations, but at the same time was it interesting to get Caroline's POV on leaving the old life behind. And, her worries about the baby was the thing that really got to me, just the thought of how worrisome everything would be, not even knowing if there would be someone in Kansas there to help her with the birthing. I just wish the story had been a bit more moving or in some way more engrossing. 

I almost forgot to bring up the best thing, Mr. Edwards. I was so thrilled when he showed up. He's my favorite character and he did bring much enjoyment to the book and I loved reading about how he saved Christmas for the children. I can't believe that I almost forgot this. So, there were some bright spots in this boo, like the presence of Mr. Edwards. 

I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through Edelweiss for an honest review!

Monday, 18 September 2017

#CoverReveal Seven Seconds by Lisa Compton (@LisaCompton1210) @PerpetuityBooks


Seven Seconds by Lisa Compton marks the debut of a thrilling paranormal crime series.

Olivia Osborne, a forensic psychologist and former FBI agent, is blessed (or cursed depending on who you ask) with unique gifts. Olivia is able to sense what others cannot--the spiritual presence of those who have "crossed over," as well as the living who are influenced, or some cases possessed, by evil. The passing of her beloved Gran was the catalyst Olivia Osborn needed to leave the FBI behind and return to her native San Antonio. But a familiar evil has followed her home. 

When a series of brutal murders rock her hometown of San Antonio, Texas, Olivia is pulled into the investigation despite her plans to leave that part of her life behind. What if she isn’t supposed to run? What if she was always supposed to stand and fight?
  
Seven Seconds will launch in December 2017 through all major retailers in eBook, paperback, and hard cover formats. 

Additional information about the author can be found at www.Perpetuitybooks.com.

Sunday, 17 September 2017

#BookReview Close to Home by Robert Dugoni @AmazonPub

Close to Home by Robert Dugoni
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

While investigating the hit-and-run death of a young boy, Seattle homicide detective Tracy Crosswhite makes a startling discovery: the suspect is an active-duty serviceman at a local naval base. After a key piece of case evidence goes missing, he is cleared of charges in a military court. But Tracy knows she can’t turn her back on this kind of injustice.

When she uncovers the driver’s ties to a rash of recent heroin overdoses in the city, she realizes that this isn’t just a case of the military protecting its own. It runs much deeper than that, and the accused wasn’t acting alone. For Tracy, it’s all hitting very close to home.

As Tracy moves closer to uncovering the truth behind this insidious conspiracy, she’s putting herself in harm’s way. And the only people she can rely on to make it out alive might be those she can no longer trust.


**********

I was not sure that I would like this book or not. I have felt that the spark has gone out of this series while reading the last couple of books, and the one before this one was a real struggle to finish. However, I decided to give this series one more chance since I did like the first book very much.

So, how was it? To be honest, did I struggle at first with the book. The story did feel better than in the previous book, but I was several times mentally debating if I should stop reading or not since the story didn't offer any big surprises and it felt a bit sluggish. However, the story picked up when Dugoni decided to twist the story in a way that I did not foresee (thanks to not reading the blurb before starting the book) and then it got much better.

I'm not a big fan of reading about drugs, but one of the cops nieces overdosed before the events in this book, and for him did it get very personal to stop the deadly heroin from killing more people than it had already done by then. Then, we have the kid that was killed by a hit-and-run driver that case is also tragic. I was a bit surprised about how much of the story the blurb gives away. As I wrote before did I did not read the blurb before starting the book. I seldom do since they often give away too much information. And, here I was painstakingly trying to keep spoilers to the minimum and the blurb gives away several key factors. Why do I even bother? Anyway, I'm glad that I had not read the blurb before, that made some things more surprising and kept me interested in continuing reading the book.

Close to Home is an upswing from the book before. Not as interesting as the first book in the series, but interesting enough that I will read the next book in the series, especially because the way the book ended...

I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!